Setting the Scenes, How I’ve Photographed the Artist’s Model

This is the fourth and final post in a series on how I work with the Artist’s model in order to get great photo reference for my paintings.

Now I get to play movie director, I’ve got my props, costumes, actors (models) and I’m ready to build some scenes. I begin by picturing my model in her “costume”, what could she be doing?

Here’s one example; I had this slender young woman coming to my house to be photographed in a blue night gown . I start walking through my house, room by room, imagining what she could be doing in a blue nightgown.

  • Standing by the bed, changing the sheets, making them billow in the air-
  • Walking down the stairs, dragging sheets behind her-
  • Standing at the kitchen sink, washing dishes-
  • Standing with a cup of coffee and looking out my back door-
Back Window by Diane Eugster
Back Window by Diane Eugster

As ideas come, putting down some thumbnail sketches will help me to keep things organized. Of course there will be some good spontaneous scenes happening, but my head is like a squirrel on steroids when I’m actually taking the photos, so I don’t want to forget any good possibilities .

Taking advantage of natural light coming in a window is another consideration. I photographed this model in my dining room as the light streamed in the windows.

First Light by Diane Eugster
First Light by Diane Eugster

Putting something in the model’s hand, usually helps to relax them, notice the coffee cup, the flower above and the piece of fruit below.

greenapp
My painting with the model holding an apple

Always be respectful of your models, remember, even if you are paying them, they are doing you a favor by lending their likeness to be photographed for your paintings. So I’m sure to;

  • Provide a private room for them to change in, hangers included –
  • Never push a model to wear something they don’t feel comfortable in –
  • Give them breaks, offer a cold drink and some time to rest-
  • Explain what I’m looking for, casual poses. Many people’s only experience with having pictures taken of them is smiling and look at the camera, so I tell them, picture a Sears photo portrait, that is exactly the opposite of what I’m looking for –
  • Provide your model with a CD of the photos you took or download them to a photo sharing site like Dropbox –
  • Pay your model in cash, and gratefully thank them –

Start painting from those fabulous photos!

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