Moving Toward the Story 3

This is the third part of Moving Toward the Story. Many times when a finished painting is framed and on the wall I see there’s more to be done. One factor is the frame. It adds two horizontals and two verticals to the design, which can affect things. This happened with Pure Americana. Below left is the original finished version and on the right the framed painting with the changes I made to it. Can you spot at least 8 things that are different?

Below is the before image with numbers and explanations on why I added or deleted something.

  • 1. The right side of her hat is not in shadow anymore, it was too severe but more importantly it pulled the eye upward, not where I wanted it to go.
  • 2. I had to get rid of the blue mountains, even though I liked them. They created a visual weight pushing down on her. This is another example of a horizontal that wasn’t working.
  • 3. Because she has little visible face I felt the need to develop a softer texture in her hair , there was too much tension in it.
  • 4. I added the lace pattern on the top of her blouse, again, I felt she needed some softness.
  • 5. I cut down the underside of her arm, another horizontal that looked a little too heavy.
  • 6. Cut down the top of the arm also.
  • 7. Got rid of the shadow on the edge of her hat, didn’t really want your eye traveling down that line.
  • 8. Made her nose a little smaller and lowered the value slightly, it was just too strong in that sea of shadow.
  • 9. Brought the sky all the way out to the edge. The red on the upper edges of the sides was leading the eye up and out of the painting.

It’s never too late to change something in a painting as long as the freshness isn’t lost.

Moving Toward the Story 2

This is a continuation of the first blog on this subject “Moving Toward the Story”.

It’s time to reevaluate what’s happening here, this is done by asking questions.

What do I like so far;

  • The subtle play of red showing through the grey
  • The big interesting shapes in the truck

What I don’t like so far;

  • The area of her face and hat in shadow are looking too harsh now
  • Still not sure about the blue behind her head
  • Areas still need more developing, but which areas?

O.K., so those were design related things, now…..how about the story? I want the young woman to have some mystery about her. What is her situation, who is she? I want to keep her upper face in total shadow so that you can add her expression. Since there won’t be information in the upper part of her face I need to explain who she is by other things; such as her stance, her clothing, even the texture of her hair.

To set the scene to fit my narrative, the truck needs to be older and in the country. At this point I’m really liking the black and grey against the background so am not going to add the subtle colors that were intended at the beginning. This is where “listening to the painting” is so important, sometimes we can steam roll right over something that is better than we originally planned.

Finished painting, Pure Americana

When color is no longer a concern, value does the heavy lifting. Just because I have all the values to work with between black and white, doesn’t mean I should use them all, in fact I want to use as few as possible. Adding more detail to a painting is really a matter of breaking the big shapes into littler ones with more values. The more an image gets broken down the weaker it becomes. The big interesting shapes become what I call “mushy”.

I also want to orchestrate the values, not following the reference image exactly, but using it only for the information I want.

Where do I want the most emphasis? In the girls face and outstretched arm, so that will be the only area that goes to total black.

What role does the truck play? Supporting cast. Really hold back on the values here. How few can I use to explain just enough, three.

And that blue passage behind her head that I wasn’t sure of at the beginning….I really like it now, adds to the Americana feel, in fact the title of the painting is “Pure Americana”.

Continued on Moving Toward the Story 3

Evolution of a Painting

Drifting

Have you ever “finished” a painting, than weeks later , saw that you missed the original idea? That’s what happened with Drifting, the painting below.

 

I was really excited about this image, my thoughts exploded in all directions.

  • I liked the vantage point from above, wanted a – floating, drifting, sleeping feeling.
  • I liked the intense warmth, wanted to manipulate this from warm at the top to cool at the bottom.
  • Wanted her to exist in two worlds, one of reality and one of graphic design.

Any one of these would have been interesting, but all of them at once was too much. There were parts of the painting that I really liked; her face, hair, warm light, the composition. However I got lost along the way, the relaxed flowing atmosphere I had originally pictured was not there. So how did I go about bringing it back?

First deciding what needed to change.

This is a breakdown of the areas that needed the most changes.

  • #1, shows where the color transition from warm to cool needs to be fixed. Because of the way cool colors recede, she almost looks like she is bent forward at the waist. The change is too stark, some cool would be good in the lower half, but this is too much.
  • #2, the hands- the most important area after the face that will show the mood of the painting. The gesture of these hands is too tense. Don’t always accept what you are given, change anything for the good of the painting.
  • #3, the folds are too angular, they do not fit with the idea of flowing.
  • #4, the leaves are clustered in a stiff pattern, again, not the flow I had in mind.

The final version. I haven’t touched her face yet her expression looks more relaxed. You can see how I tweeted the background color and movement. Now she appears to be floating above the ground, I see the view like something out of an airplane window.

Having a Point of View

This is a subject I’ve been thinking about a lot lately, especially during this time of COVID-19. Not having all the options in my day has forced me to be more focused.

Why do I spend 80% of every day painting, thinking about what I am painting or what I’m going to paint next?

Because it’s very important to express my feelings about my subjects, I just have to get it out. But am I really, getting “it” out? Are they reflecting what is inside me or just a piece of canvas with paint on it representing three dimension on a two dimensional surface.

For many years that is just what was happening…looks like the subject….yeah, good work, repeat. At some point this was very boring, wasn’t I more interesting than that, come on, can’t I make it more about me and less about the subject. This sounds a bit selfish, but I think that is exactly what good painting is about, your personal point of view.

Below is a recent painting I just complete, “Help Wanted”, and the versions that were necessary steps to help me arrive at my authentic point of view.

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The original photo. What I don’t like about it; the overall yellowish tone, Too much red in the lower section. This could take a nose dive into cuteness or sentiment. These things are fairly easy to overcome. Shift the color balance cooler and crop in the lower section. The sentimentality is going to be a conscious effort to not fall into what I’ve seen before.

Now for the really important stuff… what do I like, or why would I want to paint this, what’s my point of view? Looks like this you girl is waiting to be interviewed for a job. There is tension in her hands as she grips her purse, ( at least in one hand, I’ll have to re-gesture the other one) . Her face is tense and listless at once. Her blouse is a little too big maybe borrowed from someone, the hat sits at an awkward angle. Obviously not something she has worn much.

I’ve been there! Wearing uncomfortable “dress-up” clothes,trying to get a job, feeling in a trance because the Manager was too busy with important stuff to give me the time of day. An uneasy situation for sure.dan111

Above, exploring my options. I could give her a dark jacket and gloves, add something dark to the left. Taking the color out of it, turning it to pure value can help with design decisions. How am I going to fill the space in an interesting way?

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At this point I reconnected with my purpose and it was not working, why? The attitude of the hands and expression in the face were lost. The ground and her skirt were more interesting, not my intention. What do I do now?

Could put it in the failed paintings pile and move on to something else…or….really learn something and figure out how to turn it around.

She needs to be bigger in the story, crop in closer to really see her face and hands, Back to the light blouse and hands with no gloves, just attack it and make it behave!

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The beginning of the “right” thing over the “wrong” thing”. It’s a little confusing to just paint over something else, but makes you realize, this is about you, you can do anything you want to, that’s freeing!

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This is what I wanted to say, my point of view. There could be hundreds of others, but this one is mine.

 

Final Day of David Shevlino Workshop

Summing up the last 5 days of a wonderful experience attending the David Shevlino Figure Painting Workshop at the Scottsdale Artist’s School, I’ll say fabulous!!!!!

The three main things I have taken away from this experience-

Using the mixing surface on my palette in a much more integrated way. Creating new tones out of one central mix, making them all off shoots, provides wonderful nuances and harmony among colors.

Paint handling; laying wet paint layers on top of each other with just the right speed and touch creates luminous effects.

And the most important, how to see an entire subject as 5 to 7 angled lines. Perceiving like this helps to build strong compositions and render subjects correctly.

And of course all the nice people I met, the memory of a great Italian dinner with them at Gramali’s on Main Street, and all the stories we shared about painting techniques. There’s something about spending 30 hours painting the same subjects with a group of other artists that reassures you, that you are not alone in your struggles…. now on to open studio time to practice what I’ve learned!

 

 

First Workshop While in Scottsdale

Monday was a day I had been looking forward to for months, my one week painting workshop with artist David Shevlino.

David’s work intrigued me because of the fluid way he uses paint. His active subjects have life and motion, with simplified backgrounds.

This class has twenty students from all over the country, a very friendly and diverse group. On the first day David did a demo to show us his unique approach to painting.

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David Shevlino workshop demo

This was the first stage of his demo. He started on a dark grey toned canvas, which was a reverse of what I usually do.

I have always used a white canvas, sometimes with a light grey wash, but never this dark. The problem this presents is judging the light values against a light canvas is hard. I usually go too light with my flesh tones, which makes it hard to model the form before I’ve run out of light values. But starting on a dark grey surface made a medium value flesh tone appear very bright so I still had four solid lighter tones to work with which was awesome.

Second Stare of David Shelving's workshop demo
Second Stare of David Shevlino’s workshop demo

In this second stage of the demo he added warm tones in the shadows which really started to bring the painting to life. He does all this with a 2″- 3″ brush.

David Shevlino's demo
David Shevlino’s demo

At this stage David put in some of the lighter tones as well as some half tones in the light areas. Between answering our questions (of which there were many), and model breaks he didn’t get to finish before we begin our afternoon painting session, with our choice of two models for the rest of the afternoon.

Using the dark grey canvas, the large brushes and lots of oil medium, I was out of my usual comfort zone for the afternoon, but loved it! Tomorrow one model, one pose all day, see what happens …